Our weapons dictate what we are to do. They force us into awful corners.
They give us our living, they sustain our economy, they bolster up our politicians,
they sell our mass media, in short we live by them.
But if they continue to rule us we will also most surely die by them.

Thomas Merton, Cold War Letters (Maryknoll, N.Y.: Orbis Books, 2006), p. 65.
10 JUNE 1963
The Real Jubilee

JFK American University Address:
Calling For An End To The Cold War
JFK at American U: call to end the Cold War
10 June 2013: Fifty years ago President Kennedy gave the commencement address to the graduating class at American University. In his book, The Improbable Triumvirate: John F. Kennedy, Pope John, Nikita Khrushchev, Saturday Review editor Norman Cousins summed up the significance of that remarkable speech: “At American University on June 10, 1963, President Kennedy proposed an end to the Cold War.” Khrushchev called the American University Address “the greatest speech by any American President since Roosevelt.” This is the real jubilee of 2013, not 22 November.
Learn About Project Unspeakable: What do the ‘Unspeakable’ 1960s assassinations of JFK, Malcolm X, Martin Luther King, and Bobby Kennedy have to do with the ‘Unspeakables’ of today? An opportunity to join with truth-telling.
‘Project Unspeakable’ Asks The Big Questions, NPR, 30 Nov 2013 (05:33 mins)

welcome to       
rat haus reality     
rat haus reality      enter the site

You Can Jail The Resisters But Not The Resistance
by Leonard Eiger, Ground Zero Center For Nonviolent Action, 21 Feb 2014
Plowshares 3
We are truly human when we act responsibly to restore harmony and act with love and compassion to restore truth,
transparency and the equitable distribution of the resources endowed by our common Creator.

                                                                —Sister Megan Rice
We were fulfilling our right and duty according to the US-signed Nuremberg Charter that if one knows of one’s government committing a war crime, one has a right and a duty to take steps to try to stop that crime.
                                                                —Greg Boertje-Obed
In heaven Jesus has no arsenal of nuclear weapons. And as we pray in the Our Father prayer:
‘Here on Earth as it is in heaven.’ ... Nuclear weapons are a product of hell and we need to send them back there.

                                                        —Michael Walli
Letters from a Georgia Jail: Anti-Nuclear Activists Await Sentencing,”
by David Cook, Religion & Politics, January 22, 2014
“By leaking a handful of NSA documents, Edward Snowden has given us a glimpse of future U.S. global policy and the changing architecture of power on this planet.”   AND must listen: 35 min. 7/24/13 McCoy I-view on Jeff Blankfort’s Takes on the World prog
              +  Maria Gilardin’s 29 min. broadcast quality production of same from TUCradio.org.
But then it must be asked if we can remove cultural value from one part of our lives without destroying it also in the other parts. Can we justify secrecy, lying, and burglary in our so-called intelligence organizations and yet preserve openness, honesty, and devotion to principle in the rest of our government? Can we subsidize mayhem in the military establishment and yet have peace, order, and respect for human life in the streets? Can we degrade all forms of essential work and yet expect arts and graces to flourish on weekends? And can we ignore all questions of value on the farm and yet have them answered affirmatively in the grocery store and the household?
    The answer is that, though such distinctions can be made theoretically, they cannot be preserved in practice. Values may be corrupted or abolished in only one discipline at the start, but the damage must sooner or later spread to all; it can no more be confined than air pollution. If we corrupt agriculture we corrupt culture, for in nature and within certain invariable social necessities we are one body, and what afflicts the hand will afflict the brain.
The Unsettling of America: Culture and Agriculture, by Wendell Barry
(San Francisco: Sierra Club Books, 1977), p. 91.

  
6 June 2013—Edward Snowden[1][2][3][4]: I’m just another guy who sits there, day to day, in the office, watches what’s happening, and goes, “This is something that’s not our place to decide. The public needs to decide whether these [surveillance] programs and policies are right or wrong.” And I’m willing to go on the record to defend the authenticity of them and say, “I didn’t change these. I didn’t modify the story. This is the truth. This is what’s happening. You should decide whether we need to be doing this.”
     Yeah, I could be, you know, rendered by the CIA. I could have people come after me or any of their third-party partners.... And that’s a fear I’ll live under for the rest of my life, however long that happens to be. You can’t come forward against the world’s most powerful intelligence agencies and be completely free from risk, because they’re such powerful adversaries that no one can meaningfully oppose them. If they want to get you, they’ll get you, in time.
We forget ... that violence is so securely founded among us—in war, in forms of land use, in various methods of economic “growth” and “development”—because it is immensely profitable. People do not become wealthy by treating one another or the world kindly and with respect. Do we not need to remember this? Do we have a single eminent leader who would dare to remind us?
—Wendell Berry, “The Commerce of Violence,” The Progressive, June 2013